Saturday, December 14, 2013

AngularJS 1.3: a new release approaches

Heads up! A new Angular release is on its way. Since we plan to discontinues support for old browsers, we wanted to give you plenty of notice. As a secondary goal, this release will cover features to improve performance, and small API fixes that require small breaking changes and removal of apis that were previously deprecated. We're also making a change to how we number stable/unstable releases.

AngularJS 1.3 discontinues support for Internet Explorer 8


Why we're doing this:

  • Modern browsers have evolved. Although our stats tell us that only a small percentage of users are on Internet Explorer 8, maintaining compatibility requires code that slows the rest of AngularJS down.
  • In April 2014, Microsoft will be ending support for Windows XP, which means the end of support for the operating system most of Internet Explorer 8 users use.


Dropping support for Internet Explorer 8  will enable us to add more exciting features to Angular faster, decrease Angular's support burden, and cut our build time in half, while affecting only a very small proportion of users.


But what if your users still rely heavily on Internet Explorer 8? If your app needs to keep supporting older browsers, you have a few options:


  • Keep using Angular 1.2.x.
  • Use 1.3 and test (or if you're feeling lucky, hope for the best). The changes in version 1.3 won't be actively removing the hacks in Angular that make Internet Explorer 8 work. Most things that work now will probably keep working. But we're going to stop testing against Internet Explorer 8 in our CI server configuration. And we won't be fixing issues that are solely related to support for Internet Explorer 8 users.
  • Look for commercial support outside the core project - the Angular ecosystem is now big enough that it wouldn't be shocking to us if a company started offering commercial support for Angular apps on IE8. (entrepreneurs: hint hint!)


Removal of deprecated apis



We are aiming at the promise unwrapping in Angular templates that we deprecated before v1.2.


New naming conventions for release versions



Since our long term goal is to move to semantic versioning (semver) for Angular 2.0, starting with AngularJS 1.3 we are replacing odd/even versioning we used previously with semver's pre-release notation.


What does that mean?

  • The first stable release under the 1.3.x release train will be 1.3.0.
  • Unstable releases toward 1.3.0 will use semver's pre-release notation (#.#.#-text.#) So, for example, 1.3.0-beta.1 and 1.3.0-beta.2 would be unstable releases.


New features for 1.3? Tell us what you care about.



We have a handful of things that we want to add, but we also want to hear from you! Since there is no good way to create a poll on GitHub, we are going to abuse GitHub a bit — if you care about a particular Issue or PR please post a comment with text "+1" on it. When the poll closes Mary Poppins will count the votes casted during the duration of the poll, *de-dupe* them and count them. (She'll then delete the vote comments and replace them with a summary comment.) The poll will close on January 2 and we'll use the results when deciding what to add to the 1.3 release.


OK. But when is Angular 1.3 actually coming?


We still have a few things lined up for the 1.2.x release train, and we want time to consider your votes. In spite of that you should see the first beta builds of 1.3.0 starting to roll out in January with the usual 1-2 week frequency.

104 comments:

  1. I'm mixed on the announcement about IE8 support - from one side, I'm glad that IE8 support is dropped, but on the other hand, upgrading for some projects will become impossible.

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  2. FEIW, IE8 is supported by Microsoft until 2020, not 2014. Remember - it went out with Windows 7.

    Not that anyone should care. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. @m_gol is correct I believe. IE6 shipped with Windows XP, and Windows XP doesn't even allow you to install IE9 or higher.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/internet-explorer/products/ie-9/system-requirements

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  4. A pity that IE8 will be dropped. We'll be stuk with 1.2xx for a long time

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I feel the same way. Lack of IE8 support will cut my potential usage of AngularJS in half; for mostly mobile projects. Now I believe I should look for other frameworks...

      Delete
    2. IE8 and its brothers are responsible for hundreds of sleepless nights for every web developer out there. IE can go to hell.

      Delete
  5. It's forward progress, IE8 can go to hell.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why don't you just stick with 1.2.x then?
      I'm not sure what the problem is?

      I think it's the right move to make. At some point this has to happen.
      Jquery does the same thing: 1.9.x for legacy support, 2.x.x ditches IE8... same will apply for Angular.

      Delete
    2. ie8 should be illegal, all it does is slow down the progress of the web

      Delete
    3. Why not to support jquery 2.x still?

      Delete
  6. I hope 1.3 would allow to disable templateCache,
    so that dynamic templates with parameters could
    be used.
    This would open great new perspectives for
    complex apps (statistics, bioinformatics).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Raise an issue if one doesn't and do a +1 on it ;

      Delete
  7. @m_gol you are right. I reworded the sentence about IE to reflect that it's the OS support not the browser support that is ending. thanks

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I would drop the support for IE9 as well. It doesn't even support CORS.

      Delete
    3. @Igor Now it sounds more to the point. :)

      Can't wait for dropping IE9... No CORS, no pushState, broken ES5 support and a lesser usage than IE8...

      Delete
  8. > our stats tell us that only a small percentage of users are on Internet Explorer 8

    Your stats are only for *public* users. There are still a large number of IE8 users sitting behind corporate firewalls that prohibit browsing the public net, so they don't appear in your logs. By cutting out IE8, you've excluded corporate devs from using AngularJS. That's really disappointing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. Corporate IE8 usage is still very high, at around 50% in some sectors.

      I understand that IE8 is a pain in the ass, but this change will really screw us.

      Delete
    2. I have to agree we just did a check 50% of our users are on IE8 it's a mix of os XP, Vista and Win 7

      Delete
    3. totally agree. And it isnt all about stats too. It is enterprise requirements. We HAVE to support IE8. As would a lot of enterprise projects. like it or not.

      We use angular. So it is indeed disappointing. I dont want to be stuck on an old version forever. but, maybe we will be.

      Delete
    4. having said that - i agree with ceasing support at some point, maybe it is just a tad early. At least, running tests, and knowing what is broken would be handy!

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    5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    6. +1 here. My company has legacy apps that hold us to IE8. I have 6,000 users that are using my Angular app on IE8. I have no say in upgrading, I hate IE8 as much as everyone else but it is an ugly truth.

      This seems like Underscore Empathy all over again. Making an assumption without checking with your actual customers. I am likely on IE8 through 2014 because of these other legacy apps.

      Delete
    7. Corporate users still use IE5 HA HA. Old browsers -> old frameworks support. Seems fair to me! Do you want Shadow DOM on IE8 ?

      Delete
    8. Whatever the Angular team does... DO NOT keep support for IE8. Phase it out. If people want support for it, they can create a compatibility library to load alongside of AngularJS. Don't punish the rest of us! -1

      Delete
    9. this article sums it up
      https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=241704516004378&set=a.236777343163762.1073741828.236757216499108&type=1

      Delete
    10. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    11. one of the deciding factors switching our sites to angular is their support for IE8., and like most of you, our traffic is international and we have roughly 10 to 15% of IE8 users. That's a huge deal for us.

      If its so easy to diss out legacy browsers, then alot of people would claim they are web developers. That's one the hard things being a developer, supporting legacy system, its also one of the things that separate a professional from bedroom programmers where they just test their work on google chrome and that's it.

      Not to bash anyone here, but like it or not, IE8 is still relevant today. Alot of users are still on that browser, and dropping support would alienate developers from using it.

      If I may point out, a similar framework which basically have the same aim as angular, a framework called Ember recently guaranteed that 2014, they'll be still supporting IE8.

      Quoting from their blog: " We know many Ember.js users still need to target enterprise and education customers, who will be on IE8 for some time.". So that's a very different tone and approach Angular is having.

      May I also inquire why does dropping IE8 support wasn't discussed in the mailing list nor in the chatroom? A lot of people here are surprised and a lot of people see they disagree.

      Here's hoping you postpone dropping support for IE8. Otherwise your forcing developers to look elsewhere. That's not a threat, sorry if that's the tone of language you're hearing, but that's the honest truth on how I'm seeing these recent developments.

      You guys just don't listen to the community. :(

      Delete
    12. Yep, same for us. We plan to use Angular for a new project but large number of corporate customers use Internet Explorer 8. Constant maintenance and growth was huge Angular's strength that will be gone now.

      Delete
    13. +1 We are midway through a corporate project and we selected Angular in no small part due to its IE8 support.

      Delete
    14. The corporate users should get out of caves! It's the cloud era !

      Delete
    15. +1 here too, within financial and other large groups it's mostly IE8. Some I work with have *only just* upgraded to IE8. I'd really like to see this decision revised for 1.3, I think it's too soon to ditch IE8 support. It's going to create a big rift in the applications running Angular - those for corporates, stuck on 1.2, and then the others.

      Delete
    16. +1, A global company (500K users) I'm developing for is just finishing a glorious project of browser upgrade. IE6 to IE8. Sad, I agree.

      Delete
    17. There's a costs to support IE 8 that I don't think the Angular team should be buburdened by

      So I still think it's okay. The Angular 1.2.x branch will be around for a while, and someone will fork it and maintain that for the corporate enterprise customers, back-porting features as needed. Supply and demand. Maybe some of you will even pay someone to do it. Just a thought.

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    18. I had to stop using AngularJS due to issues with IE 8 and 9. I develop for many corporations that are still using IE 8. For a library such as AngularJS powered by Google they should provide support and bug fixes to capture more audience and attraction, not drop support. There is more than 50% use for IE within corporation not to mention the rest of the world not just the US. You guys need to re-check your #s. This is just my entrepreneur opinion.

      Delete
  9. Yeah.. sad news for me. In some organizations, people just don't have the freedom to update their browser. They're still stuck with retarded technology. Some of my users are in that small percentage and they don't care about build time.. they just want to access their website. I'm not sure who's to blame here. Could be the angular team for not caring about these people, could be me for using an edgy technology like ng, could be these organizations that force people to use retarded technology. Hard decisions. In that position, I think I would have still erred on the backward compatibility side of thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a costly endeavour to support legacy browsers both in terms of money and application performance.
      Such decisions are weighed on cost v/s benefit graph.

      Something similar happened when Apple team decided to drop support for Flash based videos. The industry responded to it and upgraded the infrastructure around it and started supporting HTML5 as an alternative. Even adobe is now investing a lot in HTML5.

      The organisations that insist on maintaining IE8 would start investing in upgrading to modern browsers only if developers start dropping support which is happening a lot especially with the apps developed by startups

      Delete
  10. Just use 1.2 if you need ie8. Why hub bub guys?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Congratulations... although there are still a lot of IE6 in China (At least tens of millions of IE6 users in China ), IE8... may be a billions of users. so we don't care too... :)

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  12. This IE8 stuff really bothers me. Why should they spend so much extra development hours to support an outdated, non standards compliant, insecure browser? Because IT departments are lazy and incompetent? Really, why are you using Windows XP still? If your corporation needs IE8 support either do it yourself or buy it. I know I don't want to pay for your incompetence. Maybe if people had to pay for it their IT departments would have to get off their butts and upgrade. Or, maybe allow use of Firefox or WebKit browser. How much time and money is wasted to support IE?

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    Replies
    1. Thank you very much! This is exactly what I wasthinking when reading through the posts above.

      Delete
    2. Like it or not this ISNT reality, and developers dont have a choice. The only one 'paying' for it will be angular cutting its potential userbase

      Delete
    3. The developers who stick with IE8 are not your enemies. We are forced to do it. Please keep this in your mind :) Please don't say it like we have choices.

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    4. I don't think it's fair tosay the IT departments are lazy and incompetent. More often then not it's some third part software vendor that selss some enterprice application that requires it. This is frequently the reason IT cannot upgrade.

      Delete
    5. Some fee paying customers stipulate ie8 support.
      Customers pay the bills and although they can be encouraged, they can't be forced. So customer projects stick with 1.2 and Angular looses some of the corporate testing base on the active branch until the fee paying customers tell Angular otherwise. Simples.

      "To push the envelope - one must be still inside of it."

      Delete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. Will you be accepting pull requests submitted by the community for IE8 compatibility issues?

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  15. Will Angular 1.2.x be maintained after 1.3.x coming out? Just like jQuery 1.x & 2.0 ?
    We really need to supporting IE8 these one or two year at least.

    ReplyDelete
  16. My app's analytics say that 75% of our IE8 users are on Windows 7, not XP. I think dropping IE8 support in Angular is about 1 year too early. http://theie8countdown.com/

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  17. I have to agree with the Angular team on this. Keeping the technology back due to possibly having to stick with 1.2 for some clients is just not a good move. I know where some of you are coming from, however when I've put my foot down with clients and simply told them my product wont work for them then, they've made it work and moved to chrome. Even in schools this has happened. Basically if your product is good enough and fills a big enough need they will put enough pressure on IT to either upgrade or find work arounds. Either way we make the web a better place.

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  18. The full web should stop supporting IE8! There should be red messages with position fixed height 50% on ALL websites including Google.

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  19. This is really good news. I am in the middle of a project that was (sure as hades) going to support (blind Io forbid) IE7!!? (Yes, corporate customers) Now I can smugly point at this post and drop all support for everything below IE9. <3

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  20. Hey guys,
    We noticed this: "Since there is no good way to create a poll on GitHub, we are going to abuse GitHub a bit"

    There actually *is* a good way to create a poll on GitHub: check out www.zenhub.io which injects a sleek and functional +1 button (as well as kanban boards, file uploads, and a few more cool features) right within the GitHub interface.

    Disc: I work with Axiom Zen, the creators of ZenHub.

    ReplyDelete
  21. 6% of our visitors use IE8. If we remove this support it will be like saying to every 17th shop visitor - 'Sorry mate, you can not come it here, you are too old'. Empathy. :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For us it's 7% which roughly equals several hundred thousand visitors each month and we aren't that big.

      I can only imagine what those stats are for companies that have an older customer base.

      I wish dropping IE8 support was easy but I know from experience it'll still be a challenge for a large number of companies out there, especially when it comes to the amount of money being generated off those users on IE8.

      Anyways, no more Angular for us in the near future. GG.

      Delete
  22. We have already dropped support for IE8 for one of our projects. We will also drop support for IE9 when IE11 takes a hold. But I agree with other posts that it depends on your client and who is using your web app.

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  23. Can IE8 support not be pulled into its own supporting file so that those who want to have some level of backwards compatibility, can... and allow the community to help maintain it. That way the core library can continue pushing the boundaries of what can be done while still proving some level of support for our crappy customers who refuse to upgrade.

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  24. Google Apps already stopped supporting IE9. Dropping IE8 support is totally appropriate if some of Google's most popular products (Gmail, Docs, etc.) have already dropped support for IE9. I have taken a similar approach; I test the latest 2 stable versions of popular desktop and mobile browsers and that's it. It's not worth the time and energy spent trying to make things work that I already have working.

    "The changes in version 1.3 won't be actively removing the hacks in Angular that make Internet Explorer 8 work."
    I disagree with this, however. I think that if you're going to drop IE8 support, drop it. Kill the hacks, and let other people maintain a fork of Angular that support IE8 if it's that important to them (similar to what jQuery is doing, though they're maintaining both versions themselves).

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    Replies
    1. Good point and the only possible way to go... Upgrading is so easy nowadays...

      Delete
  25. Very unexpected! Dropping support for a Browser like IE8 would be a "2.0.0-move" in my opinion. We just started to use Angular and since version 1.0 to 1.2 supported IE8 we thought this would last at least till 2.0.0. I think this is "un-semver".

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    Replies
    1. Angular guys, is there any chance you could change the policy so that you still run IE8 tests and report on which features are not stable for IE8?
      We've spent a lot of effort (and money) to build an application based on Angular, and now we're kind of screwed since our customers are mostly corporate...

      Delete
    2. I'm in the exact same situation.

      We've also put in a lot of money and time in making angularjs our main frontend code framework, by refactoring old legacy code and writing all new code in angularjs.
      We only have enterprise customers and 15% use IE8. We just can't tell them to upgrade there browsers.


      Right now it just sucks to have evangelised for angularjs :(

      If you ask me, this is a too fast move from your side to drop IE8 support. I agree that at some point you should drop support for IE8, but not this sudden.

      Delete
    3. Same situation here. We have 21% IE8 customers (24.048 connections /112.879 in 2014), our customers are corporations so making them change is very hard (we were only able to drop IE7 support recenlty thanks to MS dropping XP support).
      I wish they has followed the jQuery way and still maintained an "old" branch for a year or two for people like us...

      Delete
    4. Its simple - say them to use other browser (there are portable versions of many browsers)... They can be "sticked" in IE8 for internal corporate systems and use other browser for the new systems... Its in fact what we did at our company. The users happily accepted it...

      Delete
    5. In fact, our company is a public Government Company with a very huge userbase as you can see in this website: http://www.capital.sp.gov.br/portal

      Delete
  26. Good news for open-minded developers, not so good for corporate devs who have to support enterprise infrastructure.

    ReplyDelete
  27. First off, thank you for the work you've all put into making AngularJS an awesome framework — I've really enjoyed working with it. That said, support for IE8 (as much as I hate it) is a requirement for us, and was a key reason we decided to go with Angular. I support discontinuing support for IE8, but doing it so abruptly is bad for the community.

    If you want people to build "real" things with Angular, instead of just toy apps, there needs to be a certain amount of stability and predictability. We've invested hundreds of hours or work and many thousands of dollars into implementing Angular at our business, and this blindsided us. What about deprecation schedules? What about support policies? Maybe I missed it, but was this move even discussed openly on the mailing list?

    If you want to foster a good community around Angular — and I'd love to be a part of such a community — it's going to require more communication and respect. Can we talk about setting up a longer-term support deprecation schedule, instead of giving the community 1-2 months warning?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. +1 multiple times.

      My tone in previous comments was a bit sharp, so: thank you angular team for such a great framework. I hope the IE8 decision can be postponed so I can continue to enjoy your great work.

      Delete
    2. +1 as well. At least it isn't as extreme as jQuery 2.0 intentionally ripping out legacy code, but some longer-term notice on this decision would be appreciated.

      Delete
  28. This is a good move: it's not like 1.2 would disappear, people can still use it.
    Fact is: javascript framework landscape is evolving extremely rapidly and angular can't lag because of support of antiquated tech.

    ReplyDelete
  29. If we always caved to the complaints of those who are forced to use IE, then the Internet would never, ever move forward. Ever. The companies that still use IE8 are the same ones who didn't want to let go of IE6.

    It's painful for developers, but this kind of pressure is the only way to bring enterprise environments into the present day. Or at the very least, drag them forward into last week.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Time to get to work on an IE8 polyfill hey?

    ReplyDelete
  31. angularjs automatically sort the object property(key) wise.
    how to solve it?
    is there any change relates to this problem in newer version?

    ReplyDelete
  32. For those people who complain a lot.
    Angular team are distributing and supporting the framework free of charge. It is not Oracle or IBM. If your big business is losing money because it relies on IE 8 then pay someone to fork Angular or to develop an IE shim.
    Angular code is in a very good state and having a paid tram that tests and shims Angular for whatever specific business environment is an achievable task.

    As for me, I got lucky and my company requires only latest IE to be supporyed. And I would rather prefer the small Angular team to concentrate on new features rather then overcoming crazy IE quirks.

    To Angular team. You are awesome! Please keep on working.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No complaints here, just surprise. Like any open source project, it's the community's job to give feedback on decisions like these. For you it doesn't matter - for us it's a major headache, and for others it means reversing a big investment in Angular. The announcement cited "low percentage of users" and the point being raised here is that it totally isn't the case in some sectors. It's worth noting.

      Delete
  33. That's very good news! Thank you
    +1 for Ray "Just use 1.2 if you need ie8. Why hub bub guys?"

    ReplyDelete
  34. Unlike a compiled language where I can pick and choose which libs to include to support additional platforms, JavaScript doesn't give us this in any meaningful way. I have to load whatever is included in the package, and if IE6 thru IE11 support is included, the library will be HUGE. FF, Safari, Chrome, and Opera all release on a regular schedule - or at least enough of one that we can depend on them. IE doesn't, so why should everyone have to pay for IE8 support in additional downloads or slow, hacky code? Drop IE8 support going forward. People will still use Angular 1.2.x. And as long as the Angular team accepts PRs for IE8 compatibility fixes, everyone should be happy.

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  35. 70%+ of American Healthcare is still stuck on IE8

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  36. this article from JSN sums it up.
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=241704516004378&set=a.236777343163762.1073741828.236757216499108&type=1

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  37. Please allow me to quote Uncle Bob:

    "A great architecture is the one that allows you to defer the choice of details such as frameworks"

    Now IE 5,6,7, 100, X or whatever is an implementation detail.

    Wouldn't it be awesome to abstract Angular - Browser communication into an API that is browser-independent? That would break the problem into two completely independent tasks:

    1. Creating a "Browser Abstraction API" that Angular needs for Browser communication.
    2. Implementing that API for individual Browsers.

    Part 1 should not know anything about Browsers.
    Part 2 is where the support decisions for individual Browsers are met.

    With that structure, even if the Angular Team drops a Browser X in Part 2,
    developers can still write new implementations by themselves.

    Is that a hopeless idea?

    BTW, off-topic but couldn't hold back: The screen I am typing this message is so tiny I inevitably have to ask if that designer ever read a book on User Experience. :)

    ReplyDelete
  38. +1 on not discontinuing support for IE8

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  39. I read all the comments and this is my intake...

    [In Favor (or how I stopped worrying and love the cutting-edge)]
    Currently I am an IT Manager in a superb company where we mostly have state of the art technology and my C/V-level executives assign me a vast budget to keep things running smoothly so in my current case I have IE 10/11 in all my workstations along with Chrome and Firefox and I allow our employees to use whichever browser they prefer for Intranet and Internet usage. In this case; I am boldly in favor of dropping IE8 support because it inhibits the grow of AngularJS and IE8 is indeed an old dinosaur that is slowly dying and the web has moved almost entirely to HTML5 which is mostly unsupported in IE8. Also it is PRACTICAL for AngularJS to focus more efforts on growth than on legacy.

    Still, a PHP-like approach of supporting and patching previous codebases (1.2.x) would be very good and the development efforts can be barely for fixing security exploits or major issues.

    [Against (or how I never stopped worrying and live a la IT Crowd)]
    In the previous enterprise were I worked at I was simply a senior developer and the IT department hardly had any budget whatsoever assigned to it. I was forced to hardcode zillions of hacks to make everything compatible and smooth. We were on legacy boxes/servers and it was near impossible to convince high-level management on any hardware investment that was not life-or-death. So pretty much if I had gone to them and said: "The libraries I am using for x-projects no longer support IE8 so we have to upgrade 150 workstations from Windows XP to Windows 7/8/8.1; it will cost approx. $15K", their reaction would have been along the lines of "We cannot waste 15K on upgrades, we know you can make it work without breaking the application; FIND ALTERNATIVES". And there are a great deal of developers that are indeed STUCK with this same paradigm.

    A viable alternative indeed is to use other browsers, but there are two scenarios here:
    1) When it is a public website you cannot ask your end customers to upgrade their machines or EVEN to use alternative browsers, a great deal of people actually think that the Internet is bound to IE and they don't even know what a browser is.

    2) You are in a corporation that uses some proprietary third-party software that relies on an obscure API that runs on a custom browser that is tied to IE for its entire functionality and your workstations rely on IE.

    How would we solve any of these two scenarios? Just force a hack in your codebase to include AngularJS 1.3.x for newer versions and AngularJS 1.2.x for IE8 or older. See below...

    [Solution]
    The truth is that with the advent of HTML5, MVC frameworks, responsive sites, and other great goodies for modern web development we cannot be stuck with legacy support (for a low user base) that would inhibit optimization (for a larger user base). However there is a very simple hack that all developers could just add to their codebases...

    i.e.
    if lte IE8 => include JS 1.2.x
    if gt IE8 => include JS 1.3.x

    Check this reference on how to include those IE tags:
    http://reference.sitepoint.com/css/conditionalcomments

    ReplyDelete
  40. I have to say that I think dropping support is understandable. The distance now between IE8 and modern browsers is too large a gap to fill. Trying to make a fast, complex Angular.js website for both handheld devices and IE8 is not feasible.

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  41. Time to release the results of the poll.

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  42. First a point. Anyone who picked angular for apps that need to support IE8 really needs to learn how to dev lib evaluations. Second point. Isn't the poll supposed to be counted by now? @Igor Minar

    ReplyDelete
  43. Could you come up with some support for browserify? It has a lot of benefits over requirejs (tried both in production)

    ReplyDelete
  44. Hey , Writer

    Your blog published on '' Internet Explorer 8 '' that I noticed your blog . I have learned more kinds of advantaged by this your blog . Really , I loved your blog . If you are looking for the best housing that is situated near Property management resources and preferably cost, look for personal landlords' residence record on the net or magazines. You will be surprised at how you will be ruined for choices as there are several different places to rental that are within your price range.

    Thank you for your Awesome Blog .

    ReplyDelete
  45. Would be really interesting to know about the benefits gained by dropping IE8. File size ? Test Suite Size? Quantified Performance Gains ? Access to new functionality... I'm all for abandoning IE8 on the "future is now" principle, but would really like to know there are some solid, quantifiable gains to be appreciated.

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  46. Thank you for the great work so far by the angular team. I agree with others where corporate users use older browsers like ie8. Especially B2B apps can't be developed with angular if ie 8 support is dropped. I think that would be huge negative. Ie8 support is serious matter and definitely needs reconsideration. We regularly check the user stats and it shows 50% of our b2b users use ie8.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Hello !

    But what about resources management in that angular , what about memory management ?
    real world app are heavy weight non todoApp or phone app
    Angular and other SPA , MVC, MVVM.... can leak easily

    ReplyDelete
  48. Is there some schedule? I'm a few weeks away from releasing a complete rewrite of my app and would rather upgrade to 1.3 before that.

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  49. We are the web, we need to make it move forward. We drop IE8 usage, but when business people shout at us "I WANT A WEBSITE THAT AUTOMATICALLY REFRESH", I see no problem answering "YEAH, BUT TO GET THIS, YOU CAN'T USE OLD BROWSERS.". That's the deal.

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  50. If you need IE8 support so badly, why not fork 1.2.x and integrate new changes yourself?
    Looks like there's enough interested devs to make it feasible.

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  51. The current 1.2.x versions don't stop working all of a sudden. You just don't get the new stuff. But if your product has to work on IE8 you don't get to use the newest stuff in web technology anyway without a whole bunch of extra work. This is good. Kudos to the Angular team for moving forward.

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  52. Why not to support jquery 2.x still?

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  53. In the UK IE8 & XP support has been extended 12 months by the Government & Microsoft.
    http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240217389/Government-signs-55m-Microsoft-deal-to-extend-Windows-XP-support

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  54. Nice write-up! If you want to promote your blog site for free, leave a comment at http://www.coreforceworldwide.com/why-we-write-for-you/

    ReplyDelete

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